• April 28, 2017
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  • This Week in Labor History
    Updated On: Mar 13, 2017
    • 1863 — Fabled railroad engineer John Luther “Casey” Jones born in southeast Missouri. A member of the Railroad Engineers, he was the sole fatality in a wreck near Vaughan, Mississippi, on April 29, 1900. His skill and heroics prevented many more deaths.
       
    • 1914 — Henry Ford announced the new continuous motion method to assemble cars. The process decreased the time to make a car from 12 and a half hours to 93 minutes.  Goodbye, craftsmanship.  Hello, drudgery.
       
    •  1954 — The movie Salt of the Earth opens. The classic film centers on a long and difficult strike led by Mexican-American and Anglo zinc miners in New Mexico. Real miners perform in the film, in which the miners’ wives — as they did in real life — take to the picket lines after the strikers are enjoined.
    •  1887 — Official formation of the Painters International Union.
       
    •  1917 — Supreme Court approves 8-Hour Act under threat of a national railway strike.
       
    • 1948 — Bituminous coal miners begin nationwide strike, demanding adoption of a pension plan.
       
    • 1960 — The United Federation of Teachers (UFT) is formed in New York to represent New York City public school teachers and later, other education workers in the city.
       
    •  1890 — The leadership of the American Federation of Labor selects the Carpenters union to lead the 8-hour movement. Carpenters throughout the country strike in April; by May 1, some 46,000 carpenters in 137 cities and towns have achieved shorter hours.
       
    • 1968 — Staffers at San Francisco progressive rock station KMPX-FM strike, citing corporate control over what music is played and harassment over hair and clothing styles, among other things. The Rolling Stones, Joan Baez, the Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead and other musicians request that the station not play their music as long as the station is run by strikebreakers.
    • 2000 — Boeing Co. and the Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace (SPEEA) come to terms on a new contract, settling the largest white-collar walkout in U.S. history.  SPEEA represented some 22,000 workers, of whom 19,000 honored picket lines for 40 days.

      THIS WEEK IN LABOR HISTORYCourtesy of www.unionist.com

       

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